Welcome to NC Rail-Trails!

North Carolina Rail-Trails works with communities across North Carolina to create trails for public use on abandoned rail corridors.

Rail-trails differ from other trails and greenways in several characteristics. The terrain for rail-trails is generally flat or gently sloped because the land was originally engineered for rail use. This makes rail-trails wonderful places to ride a bike and many are wheelchair accessible. Also, rail corridors are usually wide enough to accommodate many different types of trail use: biking, walking, jogging, horseback riding, dog walking, pogo-sticking … you get the idea.

Another positive attribute of a rail-trail is that it actually goes somewhere. Just as trains went from one community to the next, so does the rail-trail, creating a natural link between communities. Today, we can maintain these community links by utilizing existing rail corridors that are so perfectly suited for trails.

Does your community have an abandoned railroad? Would you like to have a safe place to play and exercise while preserving your community’s train heritage? Please contact NCRT if you would like us to help you create a rail-trail in your area.

Link to News Archive

To see all earlier NEWS items please go to our News Archives page.

We've added some new trail images to our Photo Gallery.

posted by curt on May 25, 2014

We've just loaded the on-line version of our latest Newsletter. Our lead article tells some history of the mills, warehouses and rail line which were central to the economy of Rocky Mount during much of the 20th century. Re-development is now occurring and a few active citizens are working hard to put in place a 1 mile rail-trail as a key piece of these changes. You'll also find updates on the Dunn-Erwin extension project, the bridge and other construction work by the Elkin Valley Trail Association in Surry County, and on the completion of the final phase of the American Tobacco Trail in Durham. While not a rail-trail in North Carolina, you may be interested in a fairly new and very popular trail in South Carolina, the Swamp Rabbit Trail near Greenville. This recent article is testimony to the effects this greenway has had on the town of Travelers Rest and shows what a great investment rail-trails can be for local communities.

posted by curt on May 22, 2014

Our initial Toast to Trails ride saw 62 happy riders cycle 36 miles on the American Tobacco Trail to the Cloer Family Vineyards for lunch, music and wine tasting. A good time was had by all and many of the riders remarked on how lovely the vineyard was and how they enjoyed the ride. We hope to make this an annual event.Thanks so much for everyone who rode, volunteered and helped coordinate this fundraiser.

                                                                                                           

posted by curt on March 28, 2014

On March 25th a group consisting of trail advocates, Durham Police, Parks & Rec staff, pastors, planners and others concerned with trail safety met at North Carolina Central Univ. to kick off a several month study of the views and perceptions of trail crime on portions of the ATT. This study is a partnership between North Carolina Rail-Trails, Dr. Kofi Boone of  North Carolina State and Dr. Deborah Bailey of North Carolina Central University. These researchers  will be leading teams of grad students in conducting interviews, public meetings and collecting survey data via questionnaires. Funding for the study was provided by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation.  We'll post any early findings here on our site over the next few months. The study is scheduled to be completed by November 2014. Stay tuned for updates on this exciting project!

For more on this initial meeting please see this article from WUNC radio

 

posted by curt on February 13, 2014

A February 2014 article takes an in-depth look at the process of planning a rail-trail in Fall River Massachussetts including the varying reactions to the plan by members of the community and follow-ups with users after it was built.  NCRT Exec. Director Carrie Banks contributed to this interesting piece.